Book reviews, Pullitzer, Booker, Costa and Children's Book reviews
Book reviews, Pullitzer, Booker, Costa and Children's Book reviews
Prize Winning Fiction
Prize Winning Fiction

1995 Costa Winner

The Moor's Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie

       
 

Publisher: Vintage

Length: 448 pages

About: Compulsive storyteller travels from India to Spain

Style: 1st person

Where: India (Bombay and Cochin)

When: 1900 to 1995

 

Publisher’s synopsis:

Moares 'Moor' Zogoiby is a 'high-born crossbreed', the last surviving scion of a dynasty of Cochinise spice merchants and crime lords. He is also a compulsive storyteller and an exile. As he travels a route that takes him from India to Spain, he leaves behind a labyrinthine tale of mad passions and volcanic family hatreds, of titanic matriarchs and their mesmerised offspring, of premature deaths and curses that strike beyond the grave. The Moor's Last Sigh is a spectacularly ambitious, funny, satirical and compassionate novel. It is a love song to a vanishing world, but also its last hurrah.

 

Extract:

 Her children were shown no mercy. 'Us rosary-crucifixion beatnik chicks, we have red chillies in our veins,' she would say. 'No privileges for flesh-and-blood relations! Darlings, we munch on flesh, and blood is our tipple of choice.'

 

 

Reviews:

Good

So, another brave and dazzling fable from Salman Rushdie, one that meets the test of civic usefulness -- broadly conceived -- as certainly as it fulfills the requirements of true art. No retort to tyranny could be more eloquent.

For full review click here.

The New York Times, Norman Rush, 14th January 1996

 

Not so good

Some of the historical parallels fall flat (Moraes is no Luther: the hounds on his trail are the Spanish police, who suspect a homicide, not the bishops of Hindu orthodoxy, who couldn’t care less what he gets up to in Spain), while elementary rules of fiction, like not introducing new characters in the last pages, are ignored: Aoi is the case in point.

For full review click here.

The New York Review of Books, J.M.Coetzee, 21st March 1996

 

About the author

Salman Rushdie was born in Bombay in June 1947. His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses (1988), lead to the Iranian leadership issuing a fatwa against him. Despite the fatwa the novel was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and won the Whitbread Novel Award in 1988. Salman Rushdie continued to write and publish books, including a children’s book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories (1990). Salman Rushdie became a KBE in 2007.

 

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<1994> -  <1996>

 

 

Ratings

Adventure

5

Filmability

4

Historical

6

Humorous

7

Intellectuality

8

Life-changing

 7

Page turner

4

Readability

5

Romance

7

 

Age guide: 12

 

 

 

 

 

Novels by same author:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adaptations:

None to date

 

 

 

 

 

 

© PWF.co.uk

 

2016 Pulitzer Prize Winner

It's a massive day in arts and journalism because the 100th annual Pulitzer Prize winners were just announced, and there's a big surprise. 2015's best artistic and nonfiction writing across 21 categories were recognized during a ceremony Monday afternoon at Columbia University in New York City. The first Pulitzer Prize was awarded to Hebert Bayward Swope, a reporter for The New York World, in 1916. (And if you're as big a fan of Newsies as I am, that paper should ring a bell, but try to think of it more positively.)

The major prize for book nerds, the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction went to The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen (Grove Press), a legitimate surprise, if you've been paying attention to the book nerd and industry buzz. The feeling around the prize in the last few months would have you putting all your hard-earned cash down on A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara to take home the award, but that's why you should never gamble. Viet Thanh Nguyen is no less deserving, and moreover, it's his debut novel, which makes it such a wonderful win.

Extract from New York Times to view full article...

Click here

 

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